X-Ray Archives - DOC

#855 Doctor missed fracture on my X-rays

Last night, I was doing a consultation with an athlete who had a fracture when she accidentally kicked a piece of furniture.

Her foot was swollen, it was black and blue. The foot was really painful and she couldn’t walk on it.

She went to urgent care and they took x-rays. She was a little concerned that they told her that it wasn’t broken. So, she called me for a second opinion.

My doctor missed a fracture on my x-rays. What should I do about that?

Well, that’s a great question and that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run Podcast.

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#826 How can I tell if I should have surgery to remove a big toe fracture fragment?

If you get a fracture in your big toe joint it can be easy to get talked into surgery. Especially if you see fragments on an X-ray.

Your doctor may call old broken bone pieces by a number of terms:

“Osteophytes”

“Fracture fragments”

“Loose bodies”

“Surgical targets”

If your doctor points them out and starts talking about surgery, the chances are good that you’re going to want to have them removed. But there are times when surgery is totally unnecessary.

How can I tell if I really need to have surgery to remove a fracture fragment in my big toe joint?

Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run Podcast.

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#825 Best imaging study to assess non-union stability

If you get a metatarsal fracture and it does not heal, doctors call it a “non-union.”

Sometimes, even if you have a non-union you can still run. Maybe without surgery.

The single most important consideration with a non-union is stability.

The more stable the bone is, the more likely the fracture will heal.

The more stable the bone is, the less likely it will cause pain.

The more stable the bone is, the sooner you can start running.

The more stable the bone is, the less likely you will need surgery.

One of the keys to deciding when it’s actually healed enough has to do with that stability. When it comes to assessing it, everybody wants an imaging study.

What’s the best imaging study to assess non-union stability when you have a fracture?

Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run Podcast.

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#790 How much earlier than X-ray can ultrasound prove fracture healing?

If you get a fracture of one of the metatarsal bones in your foot, you are not going to be able to run until it heals.

But as soon as it’s healed, you will want to start running again.

You may have recently seen the episode that I did where I was talking about how ultrasound may show signs of healing sooner than X-rays.

How much earlier can ultrasound show healing of a fracture as compared to X-ray?

Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run Podcast.

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#764 Fast & Easy vs. Fast & Cheap fracture imaging

I was just speaking with a runner who scheduled a second opinion consultation. He asked, “what is the best way to tell if my foot is broken.”

I said, “Well, there’s the fast and easy way and then there’s the fast and cheap way.”

Today on the Doc On The Run Podcast, we’re talking about fast and easy versus fast and cheap ways to tell if your foot is broken.

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#540 No Proof No Permission to Run

I get questions all the time, daily almost, where somebody will send me a message and they’ll say, “Well, I saw a doctor and they said I had this injury, and they said that I couldn’t run for six weeks. Would you let me run?” Well, the answer is no. There’s a reason doctors don’t give you permission to run, and there are really four ways that you can tell, ways you can get permission. I think it’s important to talk about these four ways that you can actually get permission to run. No proof, no permission to run. That’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run podcast.

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#493 Why runners should always get a copy of X-ray or MRI image disk!

I was just on a second opinion telemedicine call with an injured runner. She had a recurring injury that was still keeping her from running. Unfortunately, that injury first started eight years ago. When you have an injury, and you get x-rays, an MRI or a CT scan, or any kind of medical imaging study that shows more detail than the x-rays, you should always get a copy of that disc. This runner’s story is a great example of why you need those images. Today on the Doc On The Run podcast we’re talking about why runners should always get copies of the x-ray or MRI imaging disk.

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#474 Can I run if my fracture is not yet healed on x-ray?

I was just doing a call with a runner who started running before his fracture was healed on the x-ray.
In fact his regular doctor said he couldn’t run on it until the x-rays showed healing.
I let him start running on it, in a very structured way. Now he is back to full running.
If the bone is always getting stronger while it is healing, do you really need to wait until the x-ray finally proves it has fully healed?
Today on the Doc On The Run Podcast, we’re talking about whether or not you can run if you fracture is not yet healed on x-ray.

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#418 My foot x-ray was negative. Could it still be broken?

This episode comes from a podcast listener who is training for the High Lonesome 100 mile race.

Kate wrote in to ask:

I rolled my foot at my child’s field day. I heard a crunch and immediately saw swelling and discoloration on the lateral midfoot area of my left foot. An x-ray was negative. A week later there is no change. I have not run but it is not healing. Could it be broken?

That’s a great question and that’s what we are talking about today on the Doc On The Run Podcast!

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#375 Can it be a stress fracture with no crack?

I was just doing a telemedicine call with a runner with a stress fracture, and he had a really interesting question.

He said, “Look, I just really want to know if I really have a stress fracture because my doctor took an x-ray and there was no crack in the bone. I looked it up myself and the definition of a fracture is a visible crack.”

Do I really have a stress fracture, or not?

This is a great question, it brings up a really interesting point.

Today on the Doc On The Run Podcast, we’re talking about whether or not a runner can have a stress fracture, if there is no crack in the bone.

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