stress fracture Archives - DOC

#645 When will insurance pay for a bone stimulator to help my metatarsal fracture?

What if you could be out on a run, sun on your face, running two weeks ahead of schedule, faster than what you thought, or what some doctor told you?

That would be amazing, right?

Let me tell you that neither me, nor anyone, can promise you that a bone stimulator, snake oil, or fairy dust is going to make that happen.

However, it is true that bone stimulators have been shown to actually speed up fracture healing significantly, particularly problematic fractures.

The question I get all the time from runners with metatarsal fractures is, “Well, okay, if a bone stimulator might help, will my insurance company pay for a bone stimulator to speed up a metatarsal fracture, stress fracture, or some other fracture that’s really inhibiting a quick return to running?”

When will an insurance company pay for my bone stimulator to help my metatarsal fracture?

Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run Podcast.

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#633 Wanna heal a stress fracture? Make bone faster than you break it down!

Last week I was lecturing at the International Foot & Ankle Foundation medical conference in Hawaii. Specifically, I had been asked to give a couple of talks on treating running injuries.

During the day I was moderating the surgery and sports medicine session, Dr. Gary Labianco was giving a lecture on Metatarsal Fractures.

He said something that led us to today’s episode. It was genius!

“If you want to heal a metatarsal fracture, you have to break bone faster than you break it down.”

What he means is that you have osteoclasts and osteoblasts, not just repairing bone, but also removing bone throughout the healing process.

That is true. But let’s think about the other side of that equation.

Not just physicians pulling your activity back to stop breaking bone down so fast, but all of the things you as a patient could do to make bone faster.

Wanna heal a stress fracture faster? Make bone faster than you break it down!

Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run Podcast.

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#631 How can a runner tell a heel bone stress fracture from plantar fasciitis

I just did a consultation call with an injured runner who had a really interesting history with his heel pain. There was some concern that he might actually have a calcaneal stress fracture and not a plantar fascia issue.

In case you don’t know, “calcaneal stress fracture” is just the medical term for a stress fracture in the heel bone.

The heel bone is the largest bone in your foot, and runners can sometimes develop a stress fracture in the heel bone.

They are relatively rare, but there are a couple of ways that you can get these stress fractures.

The good news is calcaneal stress fractures heal pretty quickly. But if you have one, you really don’t want to run on it.

How can a runner tell a heel bone stress fracture from plantar fasciitis?

Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc on the Run podcast.

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#630 Cuboid stress fracture vs. Capsoluloligamentous strain associated with cavus foot. How can a runner tell the difference?

If you have this pain on the outside of your foot near the cuboid bone, you might start worrying you have a cuboid stress fracture.

Cuboid stress fractures are rare.

In fact, cuboid stress fractures account for less than 1% of all the stress fractures that happen in the foot in athletes.

But there is something more common that can feel like a cuboid stress fracture.

Doctors call it “capsuloligamentous strain.”

How can a runner tell the difference between a cuboid stress fracture and this thing called capsuloligamentous strain?

Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc on the Run podcast.

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#629 Cuboid stress fracture vs. Degenerative changes in OS Peroneum. How can a runner tell the difference?

If you have been running with a nagging aching pain on the outside of your foot, just in front of your ankle, you might think you have a cuboid stress fracture.

If you then get an x-ray of the foot and it shows a tiny little extra bone sitting just next to the cuboid, well that bone has a specific name and it is called an Os Peroneum.

Sometimes you can get pain from the Os Peroneum, sometimes you can get pain from the cuboid bone that’s right next to it.

If you’re a runner and you have os peroneum pain, how do you tell the difference from a cuboid stress fracture?

Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run podcast.

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#611 What if stress fracture still swells and hurts a lot?

Ivan has a great question. After watching the watching the video “Can I Run After Wearing a Fracture Boot?” he wanted to know: “It still swells and has a lot of pain what do I do?”
Anytime a runner gets a stress fracture, the main goal is to confirm the foot is healed enough to withstand the forces and stresses applied to the injured bone.
In the episode we are going to talk about:
• 3 indicators of ongoing tissue damage when you have a stress fracture.
• 3 strategies used to decide when it’s safe to run after stress fracture.
• Questions I would ask you if you called me for a stress fracture second opinion consultation.

Today on the Doc On The Run Podcast we’re talking about What to do if a stress fracture in the foot still swells and hurts a lot after wearing a fracture walking boot.

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#609 How can a 2nd metatarsal stress fracture cause a 5th metatarsal stress reaction?

I was just on a call with a cross-country runner who had had a second metatarsal stress reaction.

A stress reaction is basically like a mild stress fracture, but without any crack in the bone.

She was doing well and her foot had been getting better.

But then when she went for her first run, she had pain in her foot.

The pain during that first run was in a completely different bone. The new problem was not in the second metatarsal, it was in the fifth metatarsal on the outside of the foot.

Let’s talk about how that happens.

Today on the Doc on the Run podcast we’re talking about how a second metatarsal stress fracture might cause a fifth metatarsal stress reaction.

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#606 Can I run in cleats with a stress fracture?

Imagine your doctor tells you that you have a metatarsal stress fracture and you should not run.

Why would you come home from the doctor and call me asking, “Can I run in cleats with a stress fracture?”

Believe it or not, that actually happened.

In this case we are talking about an athlete who is actually getting better and who wanted to train on the track.

He wanted to run in cleats.

Aside from the uncertainty, he was doing okay. He was a little hesitant and wasn’t sure if cleats would aggravate the injury right or not.

Can I run in cleats with a stress fracture?

Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run podcast.

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#546 Waiting for x-ray of stress fracture miss the window

The worst runner to call me for a second opinion is someone who has been in a fracture walking boot or not running for 12 weeks or so. Why is that so bad? Well, they’re extremely aggravated. They’ve seen at least one doctor, probably a bunch of times. They’ve probably had several x-rays. They’ve been waiting and waiting but they’re not getting better and they’re very upset about that. Today on the Doc On The Run podcast, we’re talking about how waiting for an x-ray can cause you to miss your window with a stress fracture.

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#544 Stress fracture wishes as fodder for facts

In this episode we’re talking about stress fractures and we’re talking about what happens when you as a runner, wished something to be true and it’s not a fact. It’s really important that you understand this. Some of the wishes are things like, well, I want to run. The second one is I don’t want there to be a crack on my x-ray. Some facts are, well, my podiatrist took an x-ray and there was no crack. So what does that do? Today on the Doc On The Run podcast, we’re talking about stress fracture wishes as fodder for facts.

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