stress fracture Archives - DOC

#546 Waiting for x-ray of stress fracture miss the window

The worst runner to call me for a second opinion is someone who has been in a fracture walking boot or not running for 12 weeks or so. Why is that so bad? Well, they’re extremely aggravated. They’ve seen at least one doctor, probably a bunch of times. They’ve probably had several x-rays. They’ve been waiting and waiting but they’re not getting better and they’re very upset about that. Today on the Doc On The Run podcast, we’re talking about how waiting for an x-ray can cause you to miss your window with a stress fracture.

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#544 Stress fracture wishes as fodder for facts

In this episode we’re talking about stress fractures and we’re talking about what happens when you as a runner, wished something to be true and it’s not a fact. It’s really important that you understand this. Some of the wishes are things like, well, I want to run. The second one is I don’t want there to be a crack on my x-ray. Some facts are, well, my podiatrist took an x-ray and there was no crack. So what does that do? Today on the Doc On The Run podcast, we’re talking about stress fracture wishes as fodder for facts.

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#533 What is a grade 5 metatarsal stress fracture?

If you’re a runner and you think you have a grade five stress fracture because your radiology report said that or some doctor told you that, well, I have some good news and some bad news. The good news is, is that you don’t even have a stress fracture if you have a grade five stress fracture. It’s not a stress fracture at all. The bad news is, is a grade five stress fracture, is what we call a non-union, where you had a stress fracture, but that stress fracture actually failed to heal. You have basically an unhealed, and probably not going to heal, stress fracture, unless you do something. What is a grade five metatarsal stress fracture? Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run podcast.

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#526 Is a boot enough for a tibial stress fracture in runners?

Today’s episode is going to be a good one for you to listen to, if you’ve been told that you have a tibial stress fracture, or if you just think you might have a tibial stress fracture. If you get a tibial stress fracture, the chances are really good that the doctor’s going to do something to really restrict your running, and potentially your ability to move around at all. For example, if you get a fracture walking boot and it’s on your right foot, well, you can’t even drive a car so you’ve got to take this seriously. Is a fracture walking boot enough when you have a tibial stress fracture and you’re a runner? Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run podcast.

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#518 How long to wait before running with a stress fracture?

I got a question from a runner who’s had a metatarsal stress fracture who’s very frustrated, who’s trying to figure out how to get back to running. He went and saw a doctor and he was told that he had a stress fracture and the doctor told him to take some time off of running. Then he started watching some YouTube videos, started listening to some podcasts, and then asked me a very serious question: How long do I have to wait to run with a metatarsal stress fracture? Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On the Run podcast.

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#511 Can a stress fracture spread from one metatarsal to the bone next to it?

One thing that’s really demoralizing if you get a stress fracture is to spend a bunch of time in a fracture walking boot and then go get something like an MRI and be shocked and horrified when the doctor says, “Well, not only do you have a stress fracture in that bone, it looks like you’ve got a stress fracture in another bone as well.” If you think this stress fracture might have spread well, it could. But not the way an infection would spread. There is a way that stress related inflammation in a neighboring bone can spread after getting the original stress fracture. Can a stress fractures spread from one bone to another? That’s a great question and that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run Podcast.

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#503 First aid for metatarsal stress fracture in a runner

Let’s say you’re out on a run and you start noticing this weird aching pain in your foot and so you suspect you have a metatarsal stress fracture. I often get consultation calls and webcam visits, and I even do house calls for athletes who have metatarsal stress fractures. The good news is that a lot of the times, if you actually do something, when you first notice that aching pain in your foot, when you’re running, it may not actually be a true stress fracture. Today on the Doc On The Run podcast we’re talking about the five most important things you can do for first aid for a metatarsal stress fracture if you’re a runner.

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#501 Worst way to tell a stress reaction from a stress fracture

I lecture at medical conferences about stress fractures, trying to teach physicians the difference between a stress response, a stress reaction, which is basically an irritated and inflamed metatarsal bone, and a stress fracture where there’s actually a crack that can cause real trouble. One of the questions doctors ask me is what’s the best way and the worst way to tell a stress reaction from a stress fracture, because it does make a difference. What is the worst way to tell a stress reaction from a stress fracture? Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run podcast.

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#498 Best way to tell a stress fracture from a stress reaction

Metatarsal stress fractures are one of the most common overtraining injuries afflicting runners. Much of the time the stress fracture is preceded by what we as doctors call a “stress reaction. ”If you ignore the warning signs of a stress reaction and keep on running in the same way, applying the same stress, the stress reaction will advance to a full on stress fracture they can keep you out of training for months. Most people think and X-ray of the foot is the best way to tell the difference between the stress fracture and a stress reaction. But that assumption is false. If you’re trying to figure out whether or not you’re in the early phases of the stress fracture injury process you have to take action to figure out what is going on immediately. This episode will explain that process. Today on the Doc On The Run Podcast we’re talking about the difference between stress fracture and stress reaction.

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#495 How can a tarsal coalition start causing pain in a runner?

Today’s episode actually comes from a second opinion telemedicine visit with a runner who wanted to know more about a tarsal coalition. He had an X-ray and the doctor found this thing called a “C-sign.” The “C-sign” is an abnormal appearance on an x-ray that suggests a tarsal coalition. When you look at the lateral view of the foot X-ray, a bridge of bone can form, partially encircling the talus bone and the calcaneus or the heel bone. It creates a bridging bright white thing that looks like the letter C on your X-ray. A C-sign is abnormal, and it is one of the classic signs of a tarsal coalition. How can a tarsal coalition start causing pain in a runner? Well, that’s a great question, and that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run Podcast.

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