Can I run Archives - DOC

#840 What is periosteal elevation in tibial stress reaction?

What is periosteal elevation in a stress fracture in a runner? Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run Podcast.     When you get a stress fracture, one of the earliest things that you can see on an X-ray or an MRI or a CT scan is a thing […]

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#839 Why variety makes you stronger as a runner

Why variety makes you stronger as a runner. That’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run Podcast.     I got an interesting question from someone in the Injured Runners Aid Station and the question was, “Should I run without my custom orthotics to strengthen my feet?” This brings up an […]

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#838 My Stress Fracture Framework simplified

If you’re a runner and you get a stress fracture, the number one most important thing that you do is get it to calm down while you maintain your running fitness.

Based on those ideas, I built a framework that I’ve been using for years with injured runners who want to heal and want to get back to running.

In this episode we will go through my stepwise process of how I do it.

Today on the Doc On The Run Podcast we’re talking about my stress fracture framework simplified.

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#837 The most important ingredient for healing a stress fracture

Pain is the most useful and likely most underutilized tool available to any runner who is tired of waiting for doctors to give them permission to run.

How you track your pain is important.

One of the critical components in the running injury secrets framework that I discussed in the first episode of the members only podcast in the Injured Runners Aid Station is about pain caused from damage in the tissue versus pain caused by inflammation around the tissue.

You cannot run without understanding the difference, at least not safely.

Is the pain from injury or just inflammation?

Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run Podcast.

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#836 Is the pain from injury or inflammation?

Pain is the most useful and likely most underutilized tool available to any runner who is tired of waiting for doctors to give them permission to run.

How you track your pain is important.

One of the critical components in the running injury secrets framework that I discussed in the first episode of the members only podcast in the Injured Runners Aid Station is about pain caused from damage in the tissue versus pain caused by inflammation around the tissue.

You cannot run without understanding the difference, at least not safely.

Is the pain from injury or just inflammation?

Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run Podcast.

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#835 2 ways capsulitis can lead to plantar plate rupture

If you get a plantar plate sprain, it can take a long time to heal, particularly if you’re not paying close attention.

And because of that, many runners get frustrated.

I see 2 responses to that frustration:

1) go to the doctor and hope for some kind of quick fix.

2) just ignore it and run on it because it doesn’t really hurt that bad.

Both of those are bad ideas with plantar plate injuries in runners.

What are two ways capsulitis can actually lead to a plantar plate rupture?

Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run Podcast.

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#834 Osteoblast vs Osteoclast battle rebuilding bone after stress fracture

When you get a stress fracture, you need the little bitty crack in the bone to heal.

How do you do that?

First, you have to stop bending or torquing or twisting the bone in a way that led to the crack in the first place.

Second, you have to let the healing process take place.

After the inflammation goes away, and after you get some collagen sealing up the healing crack, you start to get “ossification” of the bone where it turns into hard solid bone that you can run on.

That happens through a combination of two different types of cells in the bone called osteoblasts and osteoclasts.

Osteoblast versus osteoclast, the battle that’s rebuilding bone after a stress fracture.

That’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run Podcast.

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#833 How long will it take my overtraining injury to heal?

How long does it take you to get fit enough to run a 3 hour marathon?

Well, that depends on what? It depends on what you would actually do. Not how long you wait.

How long it takes for you to heal your overtraining injury all depends on what you do, and which variables you choose to control. Not how long you wait.

Believe it or not, every injured runner who calls me for a consultation has control over far more of these variables than they think.

How long will it take my overtraining injury to heal?

Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run Podcast.

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#832 3 running drills that can cause plantar plate sprain

If you’re a runner with a plantar plate sprain, I can understand why you’re frustrated.

You have some minor vague aching pain in the ball of the foot, and you’re trying to get back to running, but you’re getting lots of conflicting advice.

In my experience, it’s very rare that a runner gets a plantar plate injury from what I call “overtraining.”

Plantar plate ligaments don’t get sprained because you ran way too much, or ran too many miles. It doesn’t really happen that way. But they do get injured by workouts designed to support your running fitness.

What are three running drills that might lead to a plantar plate sprain?

Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run Podcast.

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#831 Who’s fault if a runner is not getting better?

If you’re trying to improve and you don’t improve, whose fault is it?

Before we talk about running injuries, let’s talk about when you’re not injured. You hire a coach. You know the coach is qualified, You know your coach has given you a valid training plan, and you know that you can execute.

But then something goes sideways. Your baby gets sick. You get an additional work project. You are sent away out of town on work. Something happens, and you miss some workouts.

If you don’t communicate that to your coach, and you just skip workouts, or inadvertently stack workouts together to make up for missed workouts, and then you get injured, whose fault is that?

Whose fault is it if an injured runner is not getting better?

Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run Podcast.

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