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#609 How can a 2nd metatarsal stress fracture cause a 5th metatarsal stress reaction?

I was just on a call with a cross-country runner who had had a second metatarsal stress reaction.

A stress reaction is basically like a mild stress fracture, but without any crack in the bone.

She was doing well and her foot had been getting better.

But then when she went for her first run, she had pain in her foot.

The pain during that first run was in a completely different bone. The new problem was not in the second metatarsal, it was in the fifth metatarsal on the outside of the foot.

Let’s talk about how that happens.

Today on the Doc on the Run podcast we’re talking about how a second metatarsal stress fracture might cause a fifth metatarsal stress reaction.

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#608 The benefit of your radiologist being clueless

The radiologist reading your MRI knows nothing about your problem.

The only clues a radiologist gets about your injury are described in the clinical history section of the MRI order from your doctor.

I just got off a call with a runner who had gotten an MRI order from his doctor. He had a long history of injury but the only description on the MRI order was “Concern for fracture.”

This runner had more than just a concern for a possible fracture.

But because there was such a limited description for the radiologist, the injured runner was understandably irritated and frustrated that the radiologist didn’t have the full information.

I will admit that I also get very upset about this when I’m looking for something obscure that the radiologist is likely to miss, unless it’s on their radar.

But there is an up-side to everything!

Today on the Doc On The Run podcast, we’re talking about the benefit of your radiologist being clueless.

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#607 How can sinus tarsi syndrome cause FHL Tenosynovitis

This episode has a whole bunch of complicated-sounding terms that you may have never heard before.

One of them is sinus tarsi syndrome, and the other one is FHL tenosynovitis or flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis.

Sinus tarsi syndrome is often confused with ankle pain.

FHL tenosynovitis is often confused with plantar fasciitis.

These conditions affect opposite sides of the same foot. Yet, one can lead to the other.

Today on the Doc on the Run podcast, we’re talking about how sinus tarsi syndrome can cause flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis.

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#606 Can I run in cleats with a stress fracture?

Imagine your doctor tells you that you have a metatarsal stress fracture and you should not run.

Why would you come home from the doctor and call me asking, “Can I run in cleats with a stress fracture?”

Believe it or not, that actually happened.

In this case we are talking about an athlete who is actually getting better and who wanted to train on the track.

He wanted to run in cleats.

Aside from the uncertainty, he was doing okay. He was a little hesitant and wasn’t sure if cleats would aggravate the injury right or not.

Can I run in cleats with a stress fracture?

Well, that’s what we’re talking about today on the Doc On The Run podcast.

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#605 New running shoes made my bunion bigger

A runner called me and said, “I got some new running shoes and they made my bunions worse overnight. I think I need surgery now.”

The problem is that bunions do not typically get worse quickly.

Bunions get worse slowly because the bone is changing position.

In this episode, we’re going to talk about how it’s possible bunions could get worse from a new pair of shoes.

If you are a runner with bunions this is a situation you may want to understand.

Today on the Doc on the Run podcast, we’re talking about how new running shoes might have made your bunion bigger.

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#604 Time is the enemy when you have a running injury

We’ve all heard the saying that time heals all wounds.

While that may be true, time also kills your running fitness when you’re not training.

You have to remember that the enemy of your running fitness is not the fracture walking boot.

The enemy of your running fitness is not the crutches

The enemy of your running fitness is not your doctor.

The enemy of your running fitness is time!

Today on the Doc On The Run podcast we’re talking about how time is the enemy when you have a running injury.

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#603 5 choices with split tear in the peroneus brevis tendon

Today I was talking with a runner who has been diagnosed with a longitudinal split of the peroneus brevis tendon.
The concern with this kind of tear in the peroneal tendon is that if you can’t get it to calm down, it can only get worse.
Continually moving, irritating and producing inflammation in and around injured peroneal tendons just causes them to get weaker over time.
Many surgeons are quick to offer surgery to correct the problem.
This runner wanted to know the details of all the different treatment options when a runner gets diagnosed with a longitudinal split of the peroneus brevis tendon.
Today on the Doc on the Run podcast, we’re talking about the 5 choices runners have when there is a split or tear in the peroneus brevis tendon.

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#602 How do you stay motivated when injured?

It really seems incredible that we now have over 600 episodes of the Doc On The Run Podcast!

Today’s episode is a little different in that I actually want to ask you a question.

How do you stay motivated when you have been injured?

I’m really interested to know because this is one of the most important things you can do as an athlete when you’re recovering from an over training injury.

Much of what I’ve learned that helps injured runners is not stuff I learned in medical school.

Much of the strategies and techniques that seem to work best, I’ve learned in large part from seeing how creative injured runners can be.

Today on the Doc on the Run podcast, we’re asking a question, how do you stay motivated when you are injured?

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#601 5 changes on X-rays with Hallux Rigidus

Today we’re talking about some of the x-ray changes that happen when you get hallux rigidus or hallux limitus.

If your doctor tells you the x-rays show hallux limitus…what does it mean?

We’re going to talk about these five things that you can see commonly on the x-rays when you have hallux rigidus.

Today on the Doc On The Run podcast, we’re talking about five changes on x-rays when you get hallux rigidus.

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#600 Stretching is like a recovery day. Finite pain that pays off.

I know a lot of people are not even going to listen to this episode because I’m talking about stretching.

Many runners seem to recoil from the topic of stretching.

But if you get injured and you go to a physical therapist, you can take it to the bank that they are going to give you some stretching exercises to do.

Why?

Because stretching helps when you have tissue that is predisposed to injury because it’s too tight.

When you have that issue, you need to stretch that tissue.

Today on the Doc On The Run Podcast, we’re talking about how stretching is like a rest day, finite pain that pays off.

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